I’m no great supporter of anthropogenic global warming theories, and articles such as this one about Freeman Dyson help to demonstrate why.

FOR MORE THAN HALF A CENTURY the eminent physicist Freeman Dyson has quietly resided in Prince­ton, N.J., on the wooded former farmland that is home to his employer, the Institute for Advanced Study, this country’s most rarefied community of scholars. Lately, however, since coming “out of the closet as far as global warming is concerned,” as Dyson sometimes puts it, there has been noise all around him….
Dyson is well aware that “most consider me wrong about global warming.” That educated Americans tend to agree with the conclusion about global warming reached earlier this month at the International Scientific Conference on Climate Change in Copenhagen (“inaction is inexcusable”) only increases Dyson’s resistance. Dyson may be an Obama-loving, Bush-loathing liberal who has spent his life opposing American wars and fighting for the protection of natural resources, but he brooks no ideology and has a withering aversion to scientific consensus….

(He doesn’t like the idea either.)

Adding fuel to the growing scepticism are interesting articles such as the one entitled U.N. ‘Climate Change’ Plan Would Likely Shift Trillions to Form New World Economy

A United Nations document on “climate change” that will be distributed to a major environmental conclave next week envisions a huge reordering of the world economy, likely involving trillions of dollars in wealth transfer, millions of job losses and gains, new taxes, industrial relocations, new tariffs and subsidies, and complicated payments for greenhouse gas abatement schemes and carbon taxes — all under the supervision of the world body….

I’m not quite in line with most Bishops on the matter, though they do agree that prudence should be involved in the matter. And that it should not become a political movement bereft of scientific inquiry.

In the Rain

There’s been a lot of rain hereabouts.

I love the rain.

In the Rain

Don’t get me wrong, I love beautiful weather too.

But when you have the time to sit on the banks of a river with a good book, a roof over your head and some free time, well — who am I to complain?

Mid-Lent

Here it is mid-Lent and I am recollecting my Lenten obligations and goals. It’s safe to say there have been a lot of distractions, but that’s life isn’t it? If one never gets beyond those things which detract from prayer, then one will probably never pray.

One thing that’s been helping is remembering the difference between meditation and contemplation. While I wish that every time the moment came for prayer I was ‘in the mood’ for prayer, and that I immediately entered into some sort of contemplative reverie and felt God’s peace flowing through me, that has simply not been happening of late. Meditation involves fixing our thoughts and concentration, filling our mind; contemplation is a gift from God which flows from meditation.

So I meditate on the holy mysteries, and consciously fill my mind with thoughts of Christ’s passion, of Mary’s sorrows, the mysteries of Scripture, the mysteries of the Faith. I’m occasionally led into a true sense of contemplation, but more often than not I’m undertaking a conscious act of the will to dwell upon, to fill my mind with, thoughts of Jesus Christ.

I’ll be following up with some of the fruits of those exercises.

A Beautiful Day

It’s a beautiful day outside.

There are moments of holiness in every day, and I’ve been given to ponder upon how life in general goes on despite the ups and downs of our individual lives. For all the woes in the world, it’s a beautiful day outside, and all one has to do is walk outside to simply be in it and to enjoy it. The woes of the world will always be outdone by God’s blessings.

“Bless the Lord, all you works of the Lord; praise and exalt Him above all forever!”

An Erimitic Life

Anyone who knows me can tell you that I could easily live out my life as a hermit.

I enjoy solitude.

Of course I also enjoy getting together with friends too. But maybe I should have considered life as a hermit at some point?

The Carmelite Hermits seem to have a good idea going. As does Sister Dawiczck, who lives in a bluffside coulee off of Highway 35, in Genoa, Wisconsin.

I’ll have to pray about this. Maybe I’m being called to an even more secluded life?

Until then, I am going to go look up what a coulee is.