The First Sunday in Advent

Mass for the 1st Sunday in Advent

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I’m so thankful to be in such a prayerful place for the beginning of Advent. Yes, I certainly miss the Parish and all of our wonderful Parishioners, but the Lord is good, great, kind, and merciful.

Brethren: Understand, for it is now the hour for us to rise from sleep, because now our salvation is nearer than when we came to believe. The night is far advanced; the day is at hand. Let us therefore lay aside the works of darkness, and put on the armor of light. Let us walk becomingly as in the day, not in revelry and drunkenness, not in debauchery and wantonness, not in strife and jealousy. But put on the Lord Jesus Christ.

Rom 13:11-14

Happy Advent.

Put forth Your power, O Lord, we beseech You, and come, that with You as our protector we may be rescued from the impending danger of our sins; and with You as our deliverer, may we obtain our salvation.

Collect, from the Mass of the day.

(It’s pretty bad when you’re bald and have a COVID haircut and in need of an actual one. But — it’s #2020. 🤷🏼‍♂️ Also, the Mass is not auto-loading from Facebook up above so, there’s that, too.)

The Sunday Mass

The Mass

The good hermits asked for the Mass in the Extraordinary Form today, and today is the XXIV, and Last Sunday, after Pentecost in the 1962 Calendar.

I confess there is not much a Homily. Prayers for all of you. +

The Feast of All Saints

All Saints Day in New Orleans -- Decorating the Tombs

In addition to a great Feastday, we turned the clocks back an hour last night. And, the power came back on – first time of course since Zeta earlier this week – to wide rejoicing across the countryside.

Omnípotens sempitérne Deus, qui nos ómnium Sanctórum tuórum mérita sub una tribuísti celebritáte venerári: quǽsumus; ut desiderátam nobis tuæ propitiatiónis abundántiam, multiplicátis intercessóribus, largiáris.

“Almighty, eternal God, Who granted us to honor the merits of all Your Saints in a single solemn festival, bestow on us, we beseech You, through their manifold intercession, that abundance of Your mercy for which we yearn.”

And from the original Catholic Encyclopedia:

The Feast… It is instituted to honour all the saints, known and unknown, and, according to Urban IV, to supply any deficiencies in the faithful’s celebration of saints’ feasts during the year. In the early days the Christians were accustomed to solemnize the anniversary of a martyr’s death for Christ at the place of martyrdom. In the fourth century, neighbouring dioceses began to interchange feasts, to transfer relics, to divide them, and to join in a common feast; as is shown by the invitation of St. Basil of Caesarea (397) to the bishops of the province of Pontus. Frequently groups of martyrs suffered on the same day, which naturally led to a joint commemoration.

In the persecution of Diocletian the number of martyrs became so great that a separate day could not be assigned to each. But the Church, feeling that every martyr should be venerated, appointed a common day for all.

The first trace of this we find in Antioch on the Sunday after Pentecost. We also find mention of a common day in a sermon of St. Ephrem the Syrian (373), and in the 74th homily of St. John Chrysostom (407).

At first only martyrs and St. John the Baptist were honoured by a special day. Other saints were added gradually, and increased in number when a regular process of canonization was established; still, as early as 411 there is in the Chaldean Calendar a “Commemoratio Confessorum” for the Friday after Easter.

In the West, Boniface IV, 13 May, 609, or 610, consecrated the Pantheon in Rome to the Blessed Virgin and all the martyrs, ordering an anniversary. Gregory III (731-741) consecrated a chapel in the Basilica of St. Peter to all the saints and fixed the anniversary for 1 November.

A basilica of the Apostles already existed in Rome, and its dedication was annually remembered on 1 May. Gregory IV (827-844) extended the celebration on 1 November to the entire Church. The vigil seems to have been held as early as the feast itself. The octave was added by Sixtus IV (1471-84).

https://en.wikisource.org/wiki/Catholic_Encyclopedia_(1913)/All_Saints

All you holy men and women, pray for us.

Prayers and Blessings on this grand Feast.

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